matterverb

  • ja重要である
  • ento be important

Examples

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Well, you’re back now, that’s all that matters.
2.
No, it’s not what matters.
3.
What I’m trying to tell you is that if I turn into the Hulk again,
4.
Banner may never come back.
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1.
It didn't matter what choices we made, we would've ended up right here,
2.
on this bed, sitting next to each other in prison.
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1.
Well, that's not fair, because Jessie was in my music video.
2.
And Niall is a friend of mine.
3.
Well, we don't care about either of those things.
4.
None of that matters to us.
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1.
So you're a diehard reporter.
2.
The truth matters to me.
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1.
But my report's due tomorrow.
2.
- What's it on? - Why government matters.
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1.
I fell in love with you, Amelia.
2.
And I fell in love with this baby,
3.
and that is what matters to me.
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1.
But when that alert came in,
2.
the only thing I could think about was making sure that she was safe.
3.
That is the only thing that matters to me now.

Other meanings for matter...

matternoun

  • ja問題、事柄
  • ena subject of interest or the situation currently being discussed, which may be cause for concern, worry, or difficulty
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1.
I'm glad if today spurred social change.
2.
That's part of my job as regional manager.
3.
But you know what?
4.
Even if it didn't, at least we put this matter to bed.
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1.
All right, so never have I ever done it, done "it" in a public place.
2.
Done it?
3.
This is easy.
4.
Come on, what is "it?"
5.
- Done it? - Yeah.
6.
- You know what "it" is. - Anything, anything.
7.
Anything?
8.
Yes, you know the subject matter.
9.
- All right. - I'm not —
10.
- I have no follow-up questions. - I have never done —
11.
- I will answer as long as there's no follow-up questions. - A public place?
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1.
The guy who is narrating it sounded like he was from the US.
2.
Usually, the creepy ads aren't from the US.
3.
I mean, that's just the fact of the matter.
4.
They usually aren't.
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1.
When all else fails, take matters into your own hands.
2.
Conquer your fears, and just ask her out.
3.
Look, I'm really scared you're going to say no.
4.
- But will you go out with me? - Sure.
5.
- Really? - Yeah.

matternoun

  • ja物質、物体
  • enanything that occupies space and has mass; the substance that makes up something
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Chemistry is the study of matter.
2.
But I prefer to see it as the study of change.
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It says here that as the universe expands,
2.
all matter is slowly degenerating into a state of total disorganization.
3.
Thank, God. I thought it was just me.
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The satellite scans say there are no traces of Thawne's negative tachyons
2.
to be found in any organic matter on the planet.
3.
As for Nash, Cecile confirmed that she didn't feel any of Thawne's energy inside.
4.
According to three-dimensional imaging, Nash's brainwaves are Thawne-free.
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1.
You are not special.
2.
You are not a beautiful or unique snowflake.
3.
You are the same decaying organic matter as everything else.
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Before anyone could figure out what was happening, foods with a strange black hue had begun to take over social media.
2.
And everything from ice cream cones, to lattes, to hamburger buns, were incorporating this new craze.
3.
The charcoal found in these trendy foods comes from the charcoal of burned organic matter.
4.
Often, the remnants of wood or coconut shells is used.
5.
And once exposed to specific gases at high temperatures, the charcoal becomes activated,
6.
giving it the ability to bind to anything it touches.
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1.
- And you're in kindergarten, right? - Yeah.
2.
And what are you learning there?
3.
I'm learning about matter.
4.
There's 3 states of matter.
5.
Liquid, solid, and gas is—
6.
And matter is everything.
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1.
Interestingly enough, there is an actual difference between the brains of a normal person and the brain of a pathological liar.
2.
That difference is in the very front of the brain in a place called the prefrontal cortex.
3.
Most neuroscience studies focus on the gray matter of the brain.
4.
That's the material that actually processes information.
5.
However, nearly half our brains is made up of what's called white matter,
6.
which is composed of connective tissues that carry electrical signals from one group of neurons to another.
7.
So gray matter is where all the processing happens.
8.
And white matter connects the different parts of the brain.