hearverb

  • ja聞こえる、聞く
  • ento listen or pay attention to someone or something

Examples

PLAY
2:10 / --:--
Mute
1.
You wanna hear a new song?
2.
- Oh, I'd love to. - Yeah.
3.
- Okay. - Okay.
4.
Jingle bitch screwed me over.
5.
Go to hell, jingle whore.
9.
That's all I have so far.
PLAY
0:00 / --:--
Mute
1.
Michael, in order to expedite these negotiations, we are prepared to make you a very generous offer.
2.
And we are prepared to reject that offer.
3.
- Michael, you haven't even heard— - Never accept their first offer.
4.
What is your second offer?
5.
Twelve thousand dollars.
6.
Are you kidding me?
7.
That is insultingly low.
8.
I don't even wanna hear what your first offer was.
PLAY
3:23 / --:--
Mute
1.
So, wait.
2.
I have to ask you, 'cause when Jen was here, when you all first got together,
3.
- I asked her her side of the story of how you all met. - Mm-hmm.
4.
So she told me her side of the story of how you met.
5.
So I wanna hear your side of how you met.
6.
Yeah. So I describe it as the luckiest day of my life.
PLAY
0:37 / --:--
Mute
1.
But Jake, how can you be excited to return to your high school — the scene of Tattlegate?
2.
What's Tattlegate?
3.
Why haven't I heard anything about it?
4.
It was junior year and Jake was riding high—
5.
Charles, no one wants to hear this story... from you.
6.
It was junior year, and Jake was riding high.
7.
Sophomore year was rough.
8.
But now, I was back with a hot new look: an earring and long hair.
9.
Which was my look, and he just copied it.
PLAY
0:32 / --:--
Mute
1.
Thank you for letting us do this interview.
2.
We're grateful to hear your story.
3.
Thank you to everyone who sent their good thoughts and their prayers.
PLAY
4:24 / --:--
Mute
1.
Nona, Nona!
2.
Where's my Nona?
3.
Excuse me, we're looking for a lady elderly.
4.
Red hair, tells long stories that nobody wants to hear.
PLAY
19:52 / --:--
Mute
1.
We talk a lot about our right to freedom of expression.
2.
But we need to talk more about our responsibility to freedom of expression.
3.
We all wanna be heard,
4.
but let's acknowledge the difference between speaking up with intention and speaking up for attention.
PLAY
0:31 / --:--
Mute
1.
As you know, the yearly calendar has become bloated with holidays.
2.
We are gathered to hear the pleas of all minor holidays to determine if they will be allowed to stay.
3.
April Fool's will be taking minutes.

Other meanings for hear...

hearverb

  • ja聞く[聴く・耳にする]、聞こえる
  • ento receive sounds or perceive something by the ear
PLAY
0:10 / --:--
Mute
1.
Did you hear that?
2.
Is someone out there?
3.
Help me!
4.
Help me!
5.
Cal?
6.
Becky?
7.
Something's not right about this.
8.
I think we should head back to the road.
PLAY
12:25 / --:--
Mute
1.
Well, I guess Monica should know about Atlantic City.
2.
Du-ude!
3.
What happened in Atlantic City?
4.
Well, Chandler and I were in a bar.
5.
Did you not hear me say "du-ude"?
PLAY
4:15 / --:--
Mute
1.
Shh! Shh!
2.
What are we shushing?
3.
- We're shushing because we're trying to hear something. - What?
4.
Don't you hear that?
5.
Ah.
PLAY
3:54 / --:--
Mute
1.
Did you hear that?
2.
Actually, I did hear something.
3.
Okay, there's someone out there.
PLAY
3:34 / --:--
Mute
1.
Andre!
2.
Yeah, yeah, Rubberband, sounds good!
3.
Did you hear what she said?
4.
No, what'd she say?
PLAY
4:13 / --:--
Mute
1.
Jim? Are you—
2.
And then you'll be saved.
3.
What? Wait, I didn't hear a thing you just said.