borrowverb

  • ja〔作品や思想などを〕無断借用する、借用する
  • ento take, copy, or use as your own someone's ideas, words, etc.

Examples

PLAY
1:43 / --:--
Mute
1.
There is 1 final capstone to place on this monument to dishonesty.
2.
Ace Shrift is going to need a face.
3.
I did an image search on www.google.com.
4.
"Very handsome man."
5.
Plenty of uncomplicated-looking dullards to choose from around here.
6.
Please allow me to borrow your very handsome head.
PLAY
3:19 / --:--
Mute
1.
Marvel is once again borrowing parts of their own previously published comics for their blockbuster movies,
2.
having previously made significant tweaks to 'Civil War' and 'Planet Hulk' to get them to the big screen.
3.
This time, 'Fear Itself' plays a minor role.
PLAY
1:42 / --:--
Mute
1.
It may be hard to see the roots of modern English
2.
underneath all the words borrowed from French, Latin, Old Norse, and other languages.
3.
But comparative linguistics can help us by focusing on grammatical structure, patterns of sound changes,
4.
and certain core vocabulary.
PLAY
1:46 / --:--
Mute
1.
That's why he wrote the book for which we know him today, 'The Prince.'
2.
A short, dazzling manual of advice for well disposed princes on how not to finish last.
3.
And the answer, in short, is to be as nice as one wished, but never to be overly devoted to acting nicely,
4.
and indeed to know how to borrow, when need be, every single trick employed by the most cynical,
5.
dastardly, unscrupulous, and nastiest people who have ever lived.
PLAY
1:22 / --:--
Mute
1.
What makes it seem real is that in actual languages, letters and groups of letters appear with consistent frequencies.
2.
And the language in the Voynich manuscript has patterns you wouldn't find from a random letter generator.
3.
Other than that, we know little more than what we can see.
4.
The letters are varied in style and height.
5.
Some are borrowed from other scripts, but many are unique.